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Virginia Chapter of the

National Organization for Women

Women's Museums

Women's Historical Sites

"Women have always been a part of the past, just not always a part of our history." -- Gloria Steinem



Our contributions to this country have always been extensive and vital to the nation from the colonial era to the present moment. 

The concept of equality not only entails legal equality, but also historical recognition. Our foremothers' stories need to be included in our children's history books, in our country's museums, and be respectfully archived.

Many women's museums are in need of financial support and public recognition. Some have yet to be fully launched due to political or fundraising complications. However the perseverance to keep our histories from being lost has kept the Woman's National Democratic Club open since 1924.

Supporting our own histories can empower our futures.


In Virginia & Washington D.C.


Alice Paul Institute
In Mount Laurel NJ, the institute preserves the history of Alice Paul, one our nation's fiercest suffragists and feminists. Alice Paul wrote the Equal Rights Amendment which was introduced as a bill in Congress 90 years ago (as of 2013). It is still not law. Let's fix that!


Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway

Threading together some of the most pristine and well-preserved working landscapes found along the East Coast, this byway provides ample opportunities to hike, bike, paddle, shop, dine, and attend events relating to the area's significant and unique heritage. Underground Railroad was the name given to the secret network of roads, waterways, trails, and hiding places, used before the Civil War by enslaved people fleeing from bondage.

National Museum of Women in the Arts
Is presently the only museum in the world solely dedicated to recognizing women's creative contributions, US and abroad. NMWA brings recognition by exhibiting, preserving, acquiring, and researching art by women and by teaching the public about their accomplishments.

National Women's History Museum
The only museum dedicated in full to women's history doesn't quite exist. To get the NWHM a permanent home on the Mall in the Smithsonian family of galleries, sign this petition, and write to your congresspersons. 

Turning Point Suffragist Memorial
Located in Fairfax, Virginia, The Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association works to raise funds to erect a suffragist memorial to commemorate "turning point" of the 70 suffragists who were imprisoned in the Occoquan Workhouse for their struggle to obtain the 19th Amendment.

Sewall-Belmont House & Museum
One of the premier women's history sites in the country, the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum maintains an extensive collection of suffrage banners, archives and artifacts documenting the continuing effort by women and men of all races, religions and backgrounds to win voting rights and equality for women under the law.

The Woman's Club
Founded in 1894, The Woman's Club is an organization dedicated to enriching the lives and education of women. Today, the over 1,500 members come from all walks of life and range in age from their mid-20s to well over 100.  The Woman's Club is a private, 501(C)4 organization supported by member dues and house rental fees located in Richmond, VA.

Woman's National Democratic Club
The meeting place for Democrats in the nation's capital. WNDC engages members (women and men) in public policy and serves as a forum for Democratic leaders. One of the most important functions of the WNDC is to preserve all kinds of documentation of democratic women who made a difference in our politics – from club records, publications, photographs, oral histories, artifacts relating to the Democratic Party, related politice memorabilia, and audio/video tapes of WNDC speaker programs.

Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens
Marjorie Merriweather Post's famous estate and gardens that became a museum in Washington DC.

Workhouse Prison Museum
Our cultural lens tells us that because the suffragists were women, they were treated gently in their protest and agitation for the vote and equal rights. This is not so. The Workhouse Prison Museum housed Alice Paul and several other activists for the cause. They went on a hunger strike, and the force feeding began. The WPH has a great exhibit on the subject. It's in Lorton, VA, about 40 minutes from downtown DC.


Beyond DMV


National Collaborative for Women's History Sites
The NCWHS supports and promotes the preservation and interpretation of sites and locales that bear witness to women's participation in American life.